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3 Deadly Excuses to Stop Stalling Spokane

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When you ask people in the park what they like about Spokane they say “it’s not too big” and “doesn’t have traffic like Seattle”. Some think Spokanites are “friendly” while others point out our access to nature and recreational resources.

On the flip side, comments about barriers to Spokane’s success contain equally generic and uninspired viewpoints. But this set of assumptions has a much more dire effect on our regional mindset. Let me challenge the basis of the top three most cherished Spokane excuses:

1) Spokane just needs more time.

PROGRESS IS NOT A FUNCTION OF TIME

Ask yourself “How many thousands of years was China under dynastic rule?” It is naive to assume some natural process of growth towards more democratic and/or sustainable societies. These practices do not develop on their own. They result from cultural patterns that are directly influenced by a complex variety of real world circumstances. THIS is where the focus should be kept, not asking “Is the time finally right?” I would agree with the truism that “timing is everything” – but this nugget of wisdom shouldn’t be taken proscriptively.

Creating your own opportune moments is a powerful skill to develop. If we can get past the limit imposed by this ‘glacial time assumption’ the challenge becomes identifying methods that accelerate the process of change itself. The social time scales of the past should not be inappropriately applied to the ever-changing possibilities for the future.

2) Spokane needs new people.

NEW BODIES WON’T REPLACE OLD ATTITUDES

Often I hear it said that we have to “be patient” and wait for all the old fossils to die off before things can really start to move ahead. A variation on this idea is that Spokane needs to import a bunch of “enlightened” Californians or outside corporate talent to cancel out the effects of suspicious natives or make our economy sing.

It is hopelessly narcissistic to assume that attitudinal barriers to change will disappear with certain members of the society that espouse them. Let us not forget that these people have children (often times a larger number of them) and ideas about the what makes the world tick have a funny way of transferring through generational lines. At some point social activists will have to suck up their uncertainty and (gasp) actually engage the criticisms they despise.

3) Spokane is too poor.

HOW WE SPEND IS MORE IMPORTANT THAN TOTAL SPENDING

First off, as an American city, Spokane has a lot of fat to burn. The question is how we burn it. Are our dollars squandered on flat screen TVs or invested into energy efficient dishwashers? Do we allow our limited money to be vacuumed out of the local sphere by national and international corporate conglomerates, or do we circulate our dollars faster and more effectively in our own vibrant micro-economy?

Culture change can be spearheaded on a shoestring. The question must involve how to win hearts and minds, the money will follow. Just ask a preacher! Let’s remember one doesn’t loose weight by buying a fancy gym membership, one actually has to work out to get rid of those pounds.

Remembering Som

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We learned last Friday we had lost Som Jordan, whom many, many of us counted a true friend. Even more of us knew him as an inspiration — a stalwart believer in us, Spokane’s creative, status quo-challenging, energetic doers — and as arguably the best of us at all of those things.

The most lovely thing is happening as we each find our way through this loss: Everyone seems to understand that there’s a calling left in his absence. Not to be him, nor to fill his shoes, but to step up our own game. To give a shit. To leave our hearts on the canvas, the dance floor, the page. To tune in more closely to one another.

Our community is doing just that: creating beautiful tributes to Som. The words we’re looking for, collections of his work, spaces to mourn together and chances to make our own contribution — whether through a donation or an expression.

So here are a few beautiful tributes written by Som’s friends. <3. <3. <3. (Also this, added to the list after the fact. Wow.)

Here are links to The Spokesman‘s retrospective of Som’s work, the Flying Spiders albums and his “PA System” podcasts.

Tonight, you can attend a tribute and silent auction at The Shop. Proceeds will be donated to Caleb and Si Jordan’s Education Fund, which will help support Som’s family. (You can also just donate to the fund online.)

A memorial service for Som will be held on Sunday at The Bing Crosby Theater at 1 p.m. Following the memorial, Baby Bar will open and donate 100% of profits to the fund.

Author bio: Tamara Rice from Hopefullyknown.com, she is a lover of words and Jesus and family, though perhaps not in that order. She is the editor of over forty books, contributing writer to two books and two Bibles, author of three film-based discussion guides, and a former magazine editor and book reviewer who sometimes blogs. She’s also known to speak loudly about breast cancer, sexual abuse and mental health issues—having lived with and through all of the above.

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3 Deadly Excuses to Stop Stalling Spokane

When you ask people in the park what they like about Spokane they say “it’s not too big” and “doesn’t have traffic like Seattle”....