Lifestyle

Home Lifestyle

101 Reasons to Ride Your Bike in Spokane

0

Spovangelist is not a bike blog for the simple reason that there are so many other outstanding local bloggers covering the topic. For some reason biking and blogging seem to go hand-in-hand. Four out of twelve of the blogs featured in the Spokane Blog Bible could be considered bike blogs, or at least strongly bike sympathetic. Here is an alphabetical list, please mention any I have left out: 100 KM, 26InchSlicks, Bicycles, Brewing and Bitches, BiketoWork Barb, Cycling Spokane, FBC Spokane, Fixed the Race, Fresh – Fresher – Freshness!, Joe Blogger, Out There Monthly, Shallow Cogitations and Spokanarama.

Awhile back I wrote 101 Things to do With a Surface Parking Lot. The list was a challenge and took a couple of attempts to complete. Coming up with 101 reasons to ride bikes in Spokane, however, was a breeze. I sat down and whipped these out almost without pause. In no particular order:

  1. your engine is in your butt
  2. people in bike shops don’t try and swindle you for repair costs
  3. cleaning your windshield is as easy as blinking
  4. people think you’ve “got guts”
  5. wearing bike accessories makes your fashion distinctive
  6. insurance doesn’t cost an arm and a leg
  7. changing a tire can be done in less than fifteen minutes
  8. biking daily adds spring to your step
  9. you are more likely to wear comfortable shoes
  10. pulling up to lock your bike is a great conversation starter with pedestrians
  11. people admire your dedication
  12. skip the lines, buses and craziness on your way to Bloomsday
  13. you remind traffic to pay attention
  14. takes a huge chunk out of your carbon footprint
  15. you don’t have to buy gas – this should be reason enough!
  16. no license required
  17. great compliment to regular exercise
  18. people think you’re sporty even if you aren’t
  19. bikes come in more colors than cars
  20. you never have to worry about parking availability again!!!
  21. you can’t lock your keys inside of a bike
  22. good for your heart
  23. way more likely to stop and smell the roses
  24. pot holes are easily avoided
  25. you set a good example for kids
  26. arrive at work refreshed and ready to contribute
  27. cold temperatures locally make biking more comfortable, not less
  28. make new friends, volunteer with Pedals2People
  29. about 70,000 people die from air pollution annually (this equals the number of deaths from breast and prostate cancer combined)
  30. Spokefest will feel like a vindicating joy ride
  31. you learn the art of layering your clothes
  32. breaks aren’t mysterious and are easy to repair
  33. reconnect with the day-night cycle
  34. stop fueling the war machine
  35. improve your flexibility
  36. be prepared for spinning at the gym
  37. encourage your friends to ride bikes with authority
  38. burn more calories every day to earn that fattening dessert
  39. win free prizes on MyCommute.org
  40. don’t leave a stinky trail of carcinogens wherever you go
  41. squeeze through narrow openings when necessary
  42. harness the power of evolution in making your transportation energy efficient
  43. you can carry your transit up the steps
  44. better your balance
  45. help people cost share when you carpool to an event
  46. you’ll never be caught off guard by the weather in inappropriate clothing
  47. hit up three times as many galleries during Art Walk
  48. make the Centennial Trail your freeway
  49. free yourself from guilt about hastening peak oil
  50. tread lightly on Spokane’s battered roads
  51. be invested in watching the local bike culture grow
  52. donate your old bikes to the Village Bicycle Project
  53. become thankful for red lights instead of being angry at them
  54. remove the temptation to answer and talk on your phone
  55. get discounts on drinks at Coffee Social
  56. improve your coordination by breaking while hand-signaling
  57. what a great excuse to get to wear neon!
  58. walk the talk when you pull up for a meeting at City Hall
  59. you only have to have two functional tires instead of four
  60. enjoy carpooling across town with friends you otherwise wouldn’t get to see
  61. get some mileage out of that backpack in your closet
  62. feel the elation of coasting down a long hill
  63. support your local bike materials economy
  64. create green collar jobs with your bike service purchases
  65. more easily reuse your bike parts across different brands and models
  66. flashing lights, light ropes and accessories are legal and encouraged
  67. whoever spent years paying off their bike payments?
  68. think of biking as a non-dietary “cholesterol cleanse”
  69. you are less liable to accidentally kill a warm and furry friend
  70. take advantage of existing bike infrastructure
  71. create the demand for more bike infrastructure
  72. bump total transit costs down from #2 on your household budget
  73. invent fun biking rituals
  74. pour aggression into powering up a hill
  75. vintage rigs are just as fuel efficient as new ones
  76. earn a rad “bike muscle” above your kneecaps
  77. stave off the risk of diabetes
  78. improve your posture
  79. beat the bus to your destination
  80. increase neighborhood property values
  81. slip through the traffic jam and be on time for dinner
  82. cycling promotes mobility for seniors
  83. cut your noise pollution down to “Near Nothing, Near Perfect”
  84. get rid of the need for the volume and overhead on that 2-3 car garage
  85. British Medical Assosiation says health benefits outweigh accident risks 20:1
  86. reduce the depreciation on your transit investment
  87. give your bones a daily workout
  88. a non-pharmaceutical/barbituate way to reduce anxiety and depression
  89. boost your LDL and HDL readings
  90. reduce your mortality by 40% – commute 3 hours a week for 15 years
  91. let speed function as your AC system
  92. bicycling is a physical meditation – a must for anyone living with ADD
  93. smell the pine, orange blossom, and lilac in the air
  94. become a crusader against America’s obesity pandemic
  95. merging your commuting and exercise time frees up hours for other pursuits
  96. ditch the concrete jungle and take the scenic route
  97. bicycling contributes to economic justice and equal opportunity for all
  98. contribute to Spokane’s urban/enlightened image
  99. protect your global neighbor – air pollution exceeds traffic fatalities 3:1
  100. foil the meter maids and parking Nazis
  101. cars pollute our lakes and groundwater; bicycles don’t

A Parking Lot in Park’s Clothing

0

Every day I ride my bike past the sea of parking out in front of the INB. What little hope I had for development, sparked by those misleading “hotel property” signs last summer, was trounced when a friend explained that all the construction was for another surface lot. The nail in the coffin for my enthusiasm came when they demolished The Blvd. and chopped down its lone majestic willow tree. Like a digital mirage, the two can still be seen standing in Google street view to this day:

The swanky new parking comes with a price tag to match. At the peak of the Lion King frenzy, the lot appeared to be only 2/3 full at a going rate of $10 per spot. A blurb in the DSP’s Street Talk newsletter pointed me towards the master plan that was written for the Public Facilities District expansion.

Parking with Style
The new lot features sheltered, automated parking pay stations, new classic style light poles with wrought iron details on Main, 115 new trees, and solar powered lighting. Not bad for a parking lot!

While nobody can deny that the new lot is a vast improvement on the asphalt desert that preceded it, I have to wonder if this move effectively delays breaking ground on a planned multi-level structure. The Vision 20/20 plan fails to explain the rationale behind the timing of the current upgrade, stating only that the new lot will be around for about 10 years before Phase Two.

Downtown with a portion of current surface parking highlighted.

It was painfully ironic how Vision 20/20 carries on about the cultural and authentic place-seeking inclinations of Gen Y (see pages 24-25) only to result in the wrecking ball for one of their favorite local venues. They note a perceived disconnect between the convention center and the emerging East End, and then eliminate the nearest feature of that sought-after urban fabric.

In good faith I assume there are solid answers to all of these questions, and the plan suggests several exciting elements that will greatly enhance the downtown landscape if they are pursued. But what should the role of the public be in such a planning process? I was surprised to see that citizens were not listed as stakeholders, and only one public input meeting was cited in the report. The results of that meeting were not outlined, and so after 97 pages it is unclear how the proposal incorporates the perspective of local consumers.

We should use the assets we have, such as our visually appealing and unique historic buildings, to invest in permanent businesses and living spaces. Unnecessary parking lots flatline the heartbeat of downtown, no matter how they are used, and send the wrong message about the vision and direction we want for our city.

-Crystal Gartner

A Local Calling

0

By Crystal Clark

This old phone box was standing on the corner of First and Jefferson, crying out for a bit of attention. A quick whip of string and tin can later we have a play on outmoded technology and the connections we make in our modern lives.

My son is a natural in front of the camera, that stance is all his own. The way his left knee bends and head tilts recall his no fuss attitude.

As of today, the tin can is no longer hanging there. Given the area the phone box is in, I’m guessing the can was clipped from it’s string for recycling money.

Ladies We Love: Kate Burke

0
  • There are some women in Spokane doing some super awesome things. In fact, there are a lot of women doing awesome things, so we’re starting a new series to let you know what the women of this city are up to. To nominate someone, email us at TheSpovangelist@Spovangelist.com

Kate Burke loves Spokane. She tried out a few other places like Bellingham, WA and Chicago, IL and made the intentional decision to move back to Spokane and grow her roots deep. Kate is the Plant-a-Row coordinator at 2nd Harvest Food Bank, a localist, a cyclist and a slow food champion. Plus, she’s one of the hardest working, most dedicated people I’ve ever met. Spokane is lucky to have her.

How would you describe your activism?

My activism: The cheesy, overused quote: “Be the change that you want to see in the world” is what I try to base my activism off of. If people can see that I am doing it and that I can make it happen, then there are absolutely no excuses not to do it. I fight for a lot of things but and I find that there is so much wrong with America and the world that I have to narrow down my fight. So I picked to fight for community health and food access. Everything I do in my everyday life adds to my community one way or another. And same goes for my health. I feel that if our communities were stronger than most of our problems would just find a way to go elsewhere. I want to build up our local areas and make them full and rich!

What inspires you daily?

My lifestyle inspires me. Everyday I get up and find it so hard to get on my bike. Rain, snow or shine i ride. But everyday I dont have to get gas or deal with parking or deal with driving in a car. my life simplifies immediately. My boyfriend also inspires me. Our future goals are the same and we work everyday towards them. When I see him living his life the way he does, it makes me feel that I can do it too. My work is another inspiration for me. Going to work with like minded people is helpful and keeps me motivated. When people share an experience or a lifestyle, it makes it easier to proceed together.

What did you want to be when you were a child?

When i was really little i think i wanted to be a teacher, like my mom. But as I got a little older, around 13, I wanted to be a farmer. I think it’s interesting that I held on to that dream. I want to grow my own food and teach others how to do it and how to preserve the food too (canning and fermentation). So my two career goals melded together to be one super job!

What’s next for you?

I hope that I can get some land soon, but for now I will be trying to make my house into a small (very small) farm house on the south hill. If I do get the land I want to start about 1 or 2 acres as a vegetable garden and also some animals (rabbit, duck and pig for meat. chickens for eggs. goats for milk and of course a border collie for my pet!) then I want to set up CSA (Communtiy Supported Agriculture) boxes for pick up once a week. We would have an event on pick up days. Live music, cooking classes and food would be a few things present. This is peaceful. This is freedom.

Authors Bio: My name’s Parris from Lillslist.com, I’m a researcher by trade. For almost four years now, I’ve made my living by finding information for other people to sell. When I experienced a health crisis, I began to research for myself, trying to find ways to lose weight and solve my health problems.A little over six months later and almost 30 pounds lighter, I realized that I didn’t want to work for other people any more, but I still wanted to share my knowledge with those who could benefit from it….

Unclogging the Plunger Game

0

Washington State is home to some of the best game inventors, that is if you love Pickle-ball, Cranium and Pictionary. Soon to join the ranks of those highly popular games is the Plunger Game. Somewhere in the winter of 2008, Alex Nagy’s kitchen sink in his basement studio apartment in Spokane developed a sink clog. After returning from Rosauer’s Grocery Store, the clog had resolved itself leaving Nagy and his friends with a clean, unused plunger. Thus was the genesis of the H-O-R-S-E style game of the Plunger Game.

According to the game’s creators, Will Maupin, Alex Nagy, Alex Miller, Andrew Gutman and Taylor Smith, “This lack of clarity surrounding the creation of the game is appropriate, as the game is still being created. Every time someone picks up a plunger, they are furthering the creation of the game. A new move, style or application can be developed or discovered at any time.”

The Plunger Game might sound insane, it really is. It’s the ultimate highdea (High+idea, get it?) building to a small group of dedicated enthusiasts. For full “rules” and regulations click here.

In addition to the game’s following of loyal players, these dudes have also been getting a little bit Internet famous with these trick shots.

Author: Nelle J. Hussey from Troy-moore.com.

 

06 DIY Headboard Ideas – Creative Inspiration For Your Bedroom

0
06 DIY Headboard Ideas – Creative Inspiration For Your Bedroom

Your bedroom is your sanctuary. It is much more than just the room you sleep in. It is the place where you feel safe and relaxed, and it should be a reflection of yourself. And while the mattress is very important for a good night’s rest, the headboard is the piece of furniture that describes you. It is exactly why your next apartment improvement project should start out with DIY headboards. And below we offer you 6 DIY headboard ideas for a feature piece that is going to make a statement!

Old Door Headboard

We all love the warm feel a wooden headboard gives. And instead of spending a lot of money on buying a new one, making your headboard out of old doors is the way to go about. Many apartment improvement ideas include reusing objects you are attached with, and old doors add a sentimental value to the whole project as well. Give them a little sending, paint them, or for a rustic feel, leave them as they are. You really can’t go wrong!

Rustic Shutter Headboard


If you have a taste for the unordinary, then a shutter headboard is just what you need. Regardless of whether you use your old shatters or a pair of reclaimed ones, recycling them will result in a nice rustic headboard that will leave visitors in awe. Not to mention, this will be one of the quickest, easiest DIY projects you’ve ever completed. Paint the shutters in a color you like, let them dry, and then attach them to the wall with screws. It’s that simple.

Simple Pallet Headboard


Not only are pallet headboards easy to make, but they are not costly at all. In fact, the pallets won’t cost you a dime if you are lucky enough to get them from a lumber yard. Or from the neighbor that just renovated the house and threw them in the dumpster. Color the headboard to match your furniture or walls, or simply use vinyl wall decorations to enhance their beauty. Everyone will be jealous of how chic and amazing your bedroom looks.

Floral Headboard


It is a particularly interesting project for all of you that want to give your old wooden headboard a new shine. It can easily be done by simply painting some floral motifs onto it. But first, take your table saw to give your wooden headboard an extra smooth sanding and also add a water-based sealer. It is a great project to include your kids in, grab your paints and brushes and make your very own design.

Lovely Fabric Covered Headboard


If you want to make your bedroom a bit more elegant, then opting for a fabric covered headboard is a must. It all starts with the base: plywood, or your old headboard. Then get your glue gun and glue some foam on top of it. Now you only need to attach batting to the plywood and foam and then cover all of it with fabric. Do make sure the fabric is ironed before stapling it; otherwise, you might lose some of that elegance you are aiming for.

Plywood Headboard


And we’ve saved the best for last. A headboard that requires minimal effort, but is just as awesome as any other headboard: the plywood headboard. This minimalist headboard is a dream-come-true if you are the industrial and Scandinavian décor. Simple, yet eye-catching, a true example of how sometimes less is more!
We can all agree that investing time and effort into a DIY headboard is the first and most important step in the apartment improvement process.

Community Candid

0

This is what community looks like:

Sometimes you just get hit with an “Aha!” moment and all the talk and striving and scheduling pays off. THIS is community in action, you say to yourself. Right here, this is what it is all about!

Most recently I felt it at Jon Snyder’s campaign party, and then at the Terrain artist reception and Sustainable Uprising before that. It is usually when something special and unexpected is happening that brings a variety of people into a context where they have something meaningful to share.

By Joe Preston of Hairline Media

We’ve attended dozens of events where speakers, bands, comedians, journalists, politicians, authors and several other semi-famous figurehead types tour through our city, and they always seem especially pleased to have discovered a new audience in Spokane. Some open with jokes about misconceptions they’ve heard about the area, others admit that they had no idea what they were in for. At the end they comment how “It’s nice to see people actually dancing,” or “Those were some really excellent questions that I’m not usually asked.” Are these platitudes repeated by all traveling spokespeople, or does Spokane truly defy expectations?

The same wow factor seems to run through the audience as well. Spokanites often appear a little shocked and excited to realize they aren’t the only ones around who are interested in the topic at hand. It’s like the gold fish and the proverbial castle, it’s a surprise every time! I hope this freshness factor never wears off. I hope event-goers never get to a point of jadedness where their expectations outstrip any possible measure of human performance.

Spokanites know how to genuinely *appreciate* special gatherings – we are raised to elevate them to almost a cultish cultural practice, i.e. fighting over lawn chair real estate at the Torchlight Parade. We seem somehow immune to the “too cool for school” attitude that plagues more urban environments. It this a saving grace? Is it in my head? Who knows, you tell me.

Meanwhile, you can savor some more community eye candy from the Sarah Kramer dinner at One World.

For Som: Grief.

0

I am taking a walk with someone today whom I have only begun to know. He’s saying something about “my twin brother and I…”

“–Wait. You have a twin brother?”

“Did. He died, oh, about three years ago.”

“…”

I fumble through the awkward what-do-you-say’s in my head and settle on, “How is that for you?” Only because my time was up and I had to say something.

“Honestly, it hasn’t been awful. I reached acceptance really early.”

“Oh.” I don’t have a response for that because nobody has ever answered with anything other than: “Awful. Devastating. Catastrophic.”

I do the panic thing and start rambling on about my own experiences with grief because what the fuck else is there to do. He says he felt guilt about not doing grief right until a friend told him however he’s doing it is doing it right.

SomWe get back, he takes off and I open my laptop to Facebook.

“We’ve lost Som Jordan,” posts someone.

“What do you mean, lost?” says someone else.

Nobody is talking about cause of death, which means it’s suicide. I know that already but I pretend I don’t know and ask around just hoping it’s something else.

The paper later reports that Isamu “Som” Jordan, a huge influence in Spokane’s music and journalism scene, was found in his home this morning. Cause of death: apparent suicide.

There is this prevailing struggle with how did he possibly not see the glow around him that everybody else saw. Everybody’s posting this music video he made with Flying Spiders. The only text they include is the song’s title: “Spokane’s Finest.”

I know nothing about anything about this situation. I do know it’s not coincidence that those people we think are invincible, brilliant, miles above us — our icons — also often suffer very deeply. Searching for truth does not turn up unicorns and rainbows.

Now that that’s said, I want to talk about grief, and that you should do it however you want.

You don’t have to cry to care. You can go to a vigil or not go to a vigil. Nobody gets to tell you you didn’t know him well enough to grieve or that you’re not grieving sufficiently or right.

Today, as I grieve the loss of a friend, a lot of grief from past losses tumbles onto me as well. It all feels very messy and maybe someone would tell me I was missing the point.

When people pry about the details, some may say they’re missing the point. Maybe they are. Or maybe they have questions because they care. Because suicide is not a thing we talk about much, and it’s confusing and it hurts and maybe they feel like answers will make it hurt less. (Spoiler: It will very likely make it hurt more.)

When people spit out platitudes on the internet, some may say they’re missing the point. When they do, or they don’t, organize a benefit concert. When they speculate. When they try to talk about suicide in general or death in general or grief in general. When they do or don’t cry.

This is the messy that we’re challenged to navigate with grace: simultaneously grieving and giving others the space to do their own version of that. There are a lot of us because Som had a generous spirit. Let that be a good thing.

City of Sarah Palin Valley

0

I thought this photo snapped with a friend’s iPhone was worth sharing.

Make of it what you will.

All Local Listening on Spotracks

0

I haven’t made a mix for a while; which isn’t the same as saying I haven’t been listening to music. I have been. A lot. But I haven’t yet made an all-local mix, so here is a winter gift from me to you. Every song was meticulously picked from my itunes library and the corners of the internet, and the result is not necessarily a cohesively blending mix, but a compilation of truly awesome Spokane sound power. Enjoy!

Popular Posts

A Local Calling

Bucking up.

My Favorites

Diary of a Soup Ninja

For all its romantic fog and cozy rainy mornings, Fall scares the bejesus out of me. Four-thirty sunsets mess with my body clock, trying...

Unclogging the Plunger Game