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Bucking up.

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This is what I looked like before I was sad.

OH MY GOD JANUARY. It is so awful. There is science proving how awful it is — or “pseudoscience,” at least. According to Science, the most depressing day of the year hasn’t even happened yet — it’s on January 21st.

Factors include things like weather, holiday debt, motivation and days since falling off the New Years resolution wagon. There should also be something about “likelihood that you are hacking up a lung.” And “number of fights you’ve had with friends and/or strangers on the internet in the past week.”

Having moved through the preliminary stages of utter despair, including

pretending to just be having a bad week
getting drunk on bad beer several days in a row
coming to terms with the semi-permanent nature of the situation
and
unfettered self-pity,
I have now moved into a considerably more pleasurable stage: self-comfort. This is the part where you stop just feeling sorry for yourself and do something about it. Like eat scones every day, regard attending one yoga class in a week as a Feat of Strength, and read long-form articles about Lindsey Lohan making a low-budg film.

I’m even using my favorite mug — which (neurosis alert) I use as little as possible to prevent it from ever breaking or getting lost — on the daily.

It’s wonderful. I am pretending/recognizing that I have a disease, and treating that disease by treating myself awesomely. Which leads me to wonder why I don’t do this all the time.

Being inexplicably sad has led me to living more wholly. For now, as a survival technique. But later, maybe just for fun.

Ballot Initiative No-No’s

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With all the initiatives, referendums, propositions and constitutional amendments (not to mention candidates), voting for some is starting to resemble that nightmare situation where you’re about to take a test in a class that you forgot you registered for. In this case, consider Protect Washington to be your one-stop study guide for deciphering all the numbers.

Spokane’s moderate population density has sheltered us somewhat from the onslaught of paid out-of-state signature gatherers that try to push these things through. In Seattle they stake out every intersection and street corner, harassing pedestrians with sometimes unscrupulous tactics for a salary.

Until our state can pass some ballot initiative reforms to create accountability with the way these proposals are brought forward, Washington will remain near the bottom of the barrel, drowning in special interest requests that will bankrupt basic services and create costs far beyond what they promise to save. This election is testing more than people’s tenacity to vote, it is a test of the big corporate lobby’s

Alice in White Park

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Maybe I’m exposing my own ignorance here, but what on earth is this White Park that shows up in Google maps? Clearly “Gloven Field” is incorrect (it is supposed to be Glover Field) but White Park is news to me.

Spanning much of the land that is slated for eventual development by Greenstone, we wonder if the above area would be more appropriately labeled White Parking Lot.

I wonder what documents the Google team draws upon when they create these maps? Was there a White Park on the books somewhere back in our City’s history? Not apparently. Searching for White Park Spokane results in a bunch of directions to Aubrey L. White Park up by the Little Spokane.

A Local Calling

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By Crystal Clark

This old phone box was standing on the corner of First and Jefferson, crying out for a bit of attention. A quick whip of string and tin can later we have a play on outmoded technology and the connections we make in our modern lives.

My son is a natural in front of the camera, that stance is all his own. The way his left knee bends and head tilts recall his no fuss attitude.

As of today, the tin can is no longer hanging there. Given the area the phone box is in, I’m guessing the can was clipped from it’s string for recycling money.

Top Choices for Spokane Roofing Materials

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When you are choosing roofing materials for your home in Spokane, the most important factor is going to be longevity. While everyone wants their roof to look great and blend well with others in the neighborhood, the top concern is ensuring that the roof lasts for many years. In Spokane where Mother Nature can bring more than three feet of snow as well as plenty of rain each year, materials must be chosen wisely.

Many people choose roofing materials based on how they will look once they’re on the home, and while that is of course an important factor, you also need to consider the cost, ease of installation and how long the materials will last once installed. A new roof is one of the most expensive investments a person will make on their home, so choosing the right materials from the start will help ensure your investment is lucrative.

The National Roofing Contractors Association (NRCA) offers excellent information on technical information for roofing contractors as well as a wealth of information for consumers who are interested in updating or installing a new roof.

Things to Look For

Spokane residents and business owners who are having a new roof put on should take time to ask themselves a few things before rushing to buy anything.

  1. Are the roofing materials available in the style and color you want?
  2. Will the roofing material require special framing or tools?
  3. How durable is the material for cold and rainy weather?
  4. Is the material up to building and fire codes for Spokane?
  5. What is the overall longevity for the roofing material you are interested in?
  6. What is the cost of the material?
  7. Is the material covered by a lengthy warranty?
  8. Does the material need to be installed in a unique way?
  9. Is the material easy to install as a DIY project or will it require a professional?
  10. Does the outside temperature need to be at a certain level for installation?

Once you ask those questions, it is also important to check with expert roofing companies like sheltonroofing.com to find out the pros and cons of roofing materials that you are interested in using for your new roof. Here are some of the top materials used for roofing in Spokane, and the pros and cons of each.

Asphalt (Composite) Shingles

Asphalt shingles are one of the more popular roofing materials as they often cost less than other materials and are easy to install. They do have some pros and cons that are worth checking out.

Pros

  • Fire resistant
  • Withstand extreme weather
  • Last anywhere from 15 to 50 years
  • Simple installation
  • Cost-effective type of roofing

Cons

  • Not an eco-friendly material
  • Labor for replacement can be high since shingles can be layered a couple times before a complete replacement.
  • Quality can vary from one manufacturer to the next.
  • Extreme temperature changes can cause cracking.

Wood Shingles

Wood shingles offer a unique look to a home or office and they can last for up to 50 years if properly maintained. They offer a natural look for a home and can help improve the insulation to keep extreme temperatures outside where they belong.

Pros

  • Energy Efficient
  • Long Lasting (Up to 50 years)
  • Eco-Friendly
  • Resistant to Severe Weather

Cons

  • Low Fire Resistance
  • More maintenance than asphalt shingles
  • Should be used only on homes with direct sunlight

Metal Roofing

With modern home designs and a desire to avoid excessive labor costs while also keeping up the value of the home, many homeowners today prefer metal roofing over asphalt, wood and others. Some say that there is no better lullaby than the rain falling on a metal roof, and in Spokane, you will have plenty of rainy days to attest to that. Metal roofs are also one of the top eco-friendly choices you can make for roofing material the metal is often made from recycled beverage cans.

Pros

  • Longevity (With proper installation, chances are you won’t need a replacement anytime soon)
  • Fire Resistance
  • Rain and snow won’t settle on the slick metal as easily as other surfaces
  • Quick installation
  • Energy Efficient

Cons

  • Metal can dent with hail or debris
  • May need to be painted more often than other surfaces
  • Slick surfaces make repair work difficult
  • Not always easy to match metal when repair work needs to be done
  • Metal makes it difficult for fire fighters to enter the home if there is a fire

Every home and business out there is as unique and individual as the person who owns it, so when it is time to have a new roof installed, take the time to make sure your new roof reflects your personal taste as well as budget, but make sure it is going to have a long lifespan and will keep your home protected as a roof should.

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